How to find the right organizations for your project management career What is the most difficult part of landing a new job to improve your career? This question was asked in a recent poll on the Career in Project Management LinkedIn Group. According to the poll, the most difficult task is finding jobs and organizations. This was evident from the conversations I had with the LinkedIn group community and the comments here. Research Organizations, not Jobs. The most important thing I can emphasize on this topic is that it’s much more productive for job seekers to target organizations they are interested in working with than relying solely on job boards and applying for every job that opens up. If you are currently unemployed, I don’t mind you applying for individual jobs. However, a focus on targeting companies should be the main objective. For those who are currently employed, it’s the only way to go. It takes time to target organizations. The sooner you start the better. What can I do? I help people narrow their focus to three to ten organizations they are interested in working for. It takes time to research and narrow down the list of 30-40 companies to those that are the best fit for you, your career goals, industry/domain, size, and location. First, you need to ask yourself if they are a good fit for you. Then you can determine if you are a good fit for them. My favorite tools are the local Chamber of Commerce member directory, and LinkedIn advanced search. Your professional network and friends are a great source of information. Ask them about their experiences with companies they have worked for, or are currently employed by. Ask them if they know any good companies with the attributes that you are looking for. This could be your process:

How to find the right organizations for your project management career What is the most difficult part of landing a new job to improve your career? This question was asked in a recent poll on the Career in Project Management LinkedIn Group. According to the poll, the most difficult task is finding jobs and organizations. This was evident from the conversations I had with the LinkedIn group community and the comments here. Research Organizations, not Jobs. The most important thing I can emphasize on this topic is that it’s much more productive for job seekers to target organizations they are interested in working with than relying solely on job boards and applying for every job that opens up. If you are currently unemployed, I don’t mind you applying for individual jobs. However, a focus on targeting companies should be the main objective. For those who are currently employed, it’s the only way to go. It takes time to target organizations. The sooner you start the better. What can I do? I help people narrow their focus to three to ten organizations they are interested in working for. It takes time to research and narrow down the list of 30-40 companies to those that are the best fit for you, your career goals, industry/domain, size, and location. First, you need to ask yourself if they are a good fit for you. Then you can determine if you are a good fit for them. My favorite tools are the local Chamber of Commerce member directory, and LinkedIn advanced search. Your professional network and friends are a great source of information. Ask them about their experiences with companies they have worked for, or are currently employed by. Ask them if they know any good companies with the attributes that you are looking for. This could be your process:

  • Identify the most important attributes you value. Examples of these attributes include size, industry/domain and commute time.
  • Make a list of 30-40 candidates organizations. Do not worry about evaluating them too much yet.
  • Evaluate each organization on your list by researching the attributes that you are most interested in.
  • Reduce your list to 3-10 organizations
  • You can rank the remaining candidates according to your preference.
  • These organizations are the best to start building relationships with. While you can do up to three at a given time, I recommend not doing more than that. It is important to keep your eyes on the prize.
  • For more information on #6, please see my previous article “How to Connect with People in Your Target Organizations.” Do you have something similar? What would you do to change my approach? We all benefit when we share our thoughts and ideas. Please leave your comments. You have two options: A) Leave a comment below, or B) Share it with others who might benefit from it.